History of Tiger Milk Mushroom

The tiger milk mushroom was first reported in 1664 when a European government agent was given this product upon sailing to the South East Asian Region. According to The Diary of John Evelyn (Publication dated 22 June 1664), this mushroom was named ‘Lac tygridis’, meaning “tiger’s milk”. In his publication, Evelyn also recorded that this fungus was used by the local people to treat diseases for which European doctors found no cure. In 1890, Sir Henry Nicholas Ridley, the father of Malaya’s rubber industry, recorded that this fungus was an important medicinal mushroom used by local communities.[7] He even attempted to cultivate it but failed. In the same year, this fungus was scientifically documented by Mordecai Cubitt Cooke who named it as Fomes rhinocerotis based on a specimen found in Penang.[8] Today, it is known by the scientific name Lignosus rhinocerus.

Interesting Story

Tiger milk mushrooms are said to emerge from the very spot where the milk of a prowling tigeress has spilt on the ground. The underground fungus has tuber/sclerotia, where it will remain for a period of anywhere from a month to decades. The presence of this sclerotium can only be seen when the mushroom sprouts. Medicinal properties of tiger milk mushrooms are only found in underground, in the tuber or sclerotium, but unfortunately once formation of the mushroom’s cap and/or stem has happened, it’s believed to cause depletion of most of its nutrients.

Traditionally

Traditionally, the Tiger milk mushrooms have been used for more than 400 years as a health tonic by the aborigines or native for its healing properties on more than 15 types of medical ailments, including; treatment of lung and respiratory diseases (including asthma, cough), fever, vomit, breast cancer, chronic hepatitis, gastric ulcer, food poisoning. It’s also believed to help with wound healing and indigestion. Aborigines also boil it with Tongkat ali and used it as general tonic to strengthen the body.

Claimed Benefits

Tiger milk mushrooms have received much interest in recent years, owing to its wide-ranging enthobotanical uses, and the success in domestication of the mushroom. Several studies have been initiated to examine its safety and biopharmacological efficacy in order to validate its enthobotanical claims. Research findings have revealed that tiger milk mushroom sclerotia to contain various biologically active substances, such as polysaccharides, polysaccharides-protein complexes, and β-glucan, which demonstrate anti-inflammatoryantioxidantanti-proliferative and immuno-modulating effects.

Safety Assessment

Tiger milk mushrooms have been used for several hundred years, with no known toxicity or side effects. In accordance with OECD guidelines, various stringent toxicity studies have been conducted, and the mushroom’s safety has been scientifically assessed. Preclinical toxicological evaluation of the cultivated sclerotium of Lignosus rhinoceros tested on rats have shown the treatment did not establish any pathological changes in the liver, kidney, heart, spleen, and lung and also had no adverse effect on the fertility of the subject nor induce tetratogenic effect on their offspring.[13][14] In addition, screening by The Toxicology Laboratory of the National Poison Center, Malaysia concluded no corticosteroid were found in the cultivated tiger milk mushroom.

Cultivation

As a result of its unique growth habit, it is difficult to find. The inconsistent supply of raw material and uneven harvest quality, coupled with lack of research, prevents further exploration and study into the possible health potential of the traditional health tonic.

In the past, the mushroom had never been able to enter large-scale commercialization, until Tan Chon Seng, a researcher from MARDI (Malaysian Agricultural Research & Development Institute) made a breakthrough in 2008 by successfully cultivating tiger milk mushrooms with solid fermentation technology.

6 Potential Benefits

1: Nasal Allergy

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2: Chronic Cough

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3: Lung Disease

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4: Gastric

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5: Joint Pain

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6: Allergy

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7: Inflammation

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8: Build Immune system

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6: Allergy

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Bapa Penyelidik
Tiger Milk Mushroom

Dr.Tan, a researcher from MARDI also the advisor of LiGNO Biotech got to be on TV1’s Bumi Kita talking about Tiger Milk Mushroom.

Strongly Recommended by
Tun Dr. Mahathir bin Mohamad

At the opening of the Internation­al Convention on Biotechnology in 2002 in Kuala Lumpur, then prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Moham­ad was reported to have said that his chronic cough stopped after he consumed Chinese medicine derived from Tiger’s Milk mushroom.

The Star Paper Link: Click here

Strongly Recommended by
Tun Dr. Mahathir bin Mohamad

At the opening of the Internation­al Convention on Biotechnology in 2002 in Kuala Lumpur, then prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Moham­ad was reported to have said that his chronic cough stopped after he consumed Chinese medicine derived from Tiger’s Milk mushroom.

The Star Paper Link: Click here